Devotional

“This is all the more urgent, for you know how late it is; time is running out. Wake up, for our salvation is nearer now than when we first believed.” – Romans 13:11. 

Whether we assign a dollar value to it or not, time is valuable to us. Think about it: How much of your time do you spend stressed about not having enough time to do what you need to do. We all want to get better at time management. There are lots of different ways to help us better manage our time – you can download apps, adjust your sleep time, create lists, etc. 

Some people have the mistaken idea that time management is all about cramming more stuff into an already overloaded schedule. But that is not good time management. Good time management is all about finding the right balance in all the different areas of life. When thinking of how we view time and time management, we should start with Jesus. 

Jesus uniquely maintained a balance between worship, prayer, family, friends, work and rest. Jesus regularly spent time in prayer and in studying the Scriptures. After a long evening of healing that extended after sunset we read that,  Mark 1:35 (ESV) says, “And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed.” The more Jesus worked, the more He prayed. He recognized the need to spend time communing with God to refresh Himself.  Similarly He was immersed in the Word of God – so much so that when the Devil challenged Him in the wilderness, He answered using three passages from Deuteronomy.

Jesus fulfilled everything He set out to do, but the top priority is found in Luke 4:43.. After a busy day of healing and casting out demons, people pressed Him to stay, But He said, “I must preach the Good News of the Kingdom of God in other towns, too, because that is why I was sent.” Jesus also put a high priority on people. He spent a disproportionate amount of time with those who would carry on His ministry. Even so,  Jesus made time for individuals. In the midst of Jesus’ busy ministry, he did not let the urgent crowd out the important. The Gospel encounters are made up of a string of accounts of individuals whom Jesus paused with. He did not pause with everyone; He spoke only to one Samaritan at the well, only one rich young ruler, only one tax collector, but He found time for these individuals. As Christians, we should be managing our time because it is not ours. Just as we should think of our possessions and money as on loan to us from God, so is our time.

We also need to remember that our time is limited. We have been given a certain amount of time here on earth for our lifetime. When we rightly view all time as belonging to God, then we see how we fill that time in a different light. Remember that no one gets it all done, we only have to do the things God wants us to do—no more and no less.

Discussion Questions:

  1. If your time belongs to God, ask yourself these two questions: (1) What will be the result of this activity in five years? (2) What will be the result of this activity in eternity?